labradore

"We can't allow things that are inaccurate to stand." — The Word of Our Dan, February 19, 2008.

Friday, May 21, 2010

More medical news

First it was Dear Leader's heart, now it's the Minister of Labrador Affairs' gizzard. From Thursday's after-QP entertainment in the House of Assembly:

MR. SPEAKER: The hon. the Member for Labrador Affairs, on a point of order.

MR. HICKEY: Mr. Speaker, it turns my stomach to listen to the tripe across the way.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear!

MR. HICKEY: Mr. Speaker, this hon. member is misleading this House, is making false comments in this House. The Department of Labrador Affairs is very much engaged in the business of this government and every department in it. We have now over thirty employees with the Department of Labrador and Aboriginal Affairs, fifteen in Labrador and fifteen here on the Island. I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, when she was – I do not know, maybe she was parliamentary secretary, I am not sure what she was there –

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please!

MR. HICKEY: - I can only say this, Mr. Speaker, that department never had any say in what was happening inside of government.

MR. SPEAKER: No point of order.

The hon. the Leader of the Opposition.

MS JONES: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The comments just made by the hon. minister opposite, Mr. Speaker, just shows the calibre of an individual that he is; the kind of language that he would use in this House of Assembly. It certainly speaks to the character of the individual, I say, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, let me continue because the reality is it is costing the taxpayers of this Province nearly $5 million to pay two –

MR. SPEAKER: The hon. the Minister of Labrador Affairs –

MR. HICKEY: (Inaudible) the hon. member the investment that is made in the Department of Labrador and Aboriginal Affairs is very relevant, Mr. Speaker, with $2.4 billion after being spent in Labrador from March of 2003 to March of 2009, I say to the hon. member across the way.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear!

MR. SPEAKER: On a point of order.

MR. KELVIN PARSONS: On a point of order, I just say one thing to the hon. Member for Lake Melville. It is better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.

MR. SPEAKER: Point of order.

MS BURKE: Mr. Speaker, I would like to say on a point of order that to refer to another member in the House as a fool is certainly unparliamentary language and we would like the comment withdrawn.

MR. SPEAKER: Okay.

MR. KELVIN PARSONS: Absolutely not, Mr. Speaker, to the point of order. It has been ruled both parliamentary and unparliamentary. In this case it is a fact.

MR. SPEAKER: The Speaker recognizes the point of order made by the Government House Leader. I ask the hon. member to withdraw.

MR. KELVIN PARSONS: I refuse to withdraw the remark, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: For the second time, I ask the hon. member to withdraw the comment.

MR. KELVIN PARSONS: For the second time, Mr. Speaker, I refuse to withdraw the remark.

MR. SPEAKER: For the third and final time, I ask the hon. member to withdraw the comment.

MR. KELVIN PARSONS: For the third time, Mr. Speaker, I respectfully refuse to withdraw the remark.

MR. SPEAKER: I name you, Kelvin Parsons, and I ask you to leave this hon. House.

[Mr. Parsons leaves the Chamber.]

MR. SPEAKER: The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

MS JONES: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I will continue with my comments because it is obvious that the Minister of Labrador and Aboriginal Affairs got a very –

AN HON. MEMBER: – got a very weak stomach.

MS JONES: You got a weak stomach, you are probably right, but he does not have a tough skin either, I say to the hon. member. He does not have a tough skin that is for sure, and he cannot handle the facts and he cannot handle the information that is being portrayed here today around his department.

2 Comments:

At 7:35 AM, May 21, 2010 , Blogger Ed Hollett said...

The other part of this saga is the selective attention the incompetent Speaker pays to the rules. As you have documented and likely know from following proceedings The Speaker routinely ignores rules of decorum.

Burke, who knows less about the House rules than the Speaker (and he doesn't know much) has been trying lately to raise points of order about comments made by the Opp and the Speaker has been going along.

In this case, the language is debatable but it is by far a lot less insulting and unparliamentary than his friends have thrown in full earshot of the Chair.

But if the Speaker was doing his job fairly and impartially as he ought to (instead of siding with his caucus as in the research money vote) the House would already be in order.

 
At 2:53 PM, May 21, 2010 , Blogger WJM said...

No kidding. Right after bravely making his dyspepsia public knowledge, Hickey uses the m-word, "misleading".

 

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